What they eat: Their diet is about half plant, half animal, but they will visit most types of feeders for sunflower seeds, peanut chips, and suet. Other menu items include spiders, slugs, centipedes, and berries. and 50% insects. The diet of the Carolina chickadee primarily comprises insects, but they are also known to relish fleshy fruits, suet, berries, acorns, and seeds particularly during winter. Black-Capped Chickadees also enjoy seed from bird feeders. The Chickadees diet consist of insects, seeds and berries. They are frequent winter visitors to backyard birdfeeders, especially if the feeders contain black-oil sunflower seeds. Eating large amounts of insect eggs and larvae during the nesting season. The diet of the Carolina chickadee varies throughout the year. Thus, rate of feather growth could be considered an index of a bird's nutritional condition (Grubb 1989, 1992). The Carolina chickadee’s diet consists mainly of insects, which they catch while hopping along tree branches in the search for food and by hovering around or hanging upside down and making short flights in the air when insects draw near. During the winter, Carolina chickadees eat about 50% plant-based foods (seeds, berries, etc.) Chickadees will frequent yards that have adequate natural cover near feeders, giving the birds an area to hide quickly when threatened, as well as a protected night roost. During the winter, Carolina chickadees eat about 50% plant-based foods (seeds, berries, etc.) and 50% insects. Quantity of diet can affect the growth rate of an induced feather in Carolina Chickadees (Grubb and Cimprich 1990, Grubb 1991). You can often spot them hovering around trees, finding crevices to capture insects. The diet of the Carolina chickadee varies throughout the year. Where they live: Carolina Chickadees may be found in forest habitats throughout the southeastern portion of the U.S.Canada. Often you'll see them hanging on … The Black-Capped Chickadees dine on various insects, although smaller caterpillars are among their favorite foods. It is interesting to note that the Black-Capped Chickadee hides food and then returns to gather it later. They are frequent winter visitors to backyard birdfeeders, especially if the feeders contain black-oil sunflower seeds. Because nutritional condition may affect an individual's ability to survive the winter, ob- Carolina chickadee eating fruits. A small birdhouse with a 1 1/4-inch entrance hole, placed in heavy natural cover, may provide both a winter roost and summer nesting site for chickadees. Did you know?